Communities That Care (CTC)

 

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Five Phases of Implementation

Phase 1Phase 2Phase 3Phase 4Phase 5Staff Training


Phase 1: Get Started
     In the first phase, community leaders concerned with preventing youth problem behaviors assess
community readiness to adopt the CTC system, as well as local barriers to implementation. Other
major activities during this initial phase of implementation include identifying one or two key leaders
to champion CTC, hiring a coordinator to manage CTC activities, and obtaining school district
support for conducting a youth survey that will provide data on local patterns of youth risk, protection,
and behaviors.

Materials


Phase 2: Organize, Introduce, and Involve
     The major task in phase two is to identify and train two pivotal groups of individuals from the community
in the principles of prevention science and the CTC prevention system. The first group consists
of influential community leaders (e.g., the mayor, police chief, school superintendent; and business,
faith, community, social service, and media leaders). The main responsibilities of this group are
to secure resources for preventive interventions and identify candidates for the CTC Community
Board. This board constitutes the second pivotal group needed to advance the CTC approach. Among
the board’s tasks are developing a vision statement to guide its prevention work and establishing
workgroups to tackle the details involved in putting this vision into action.

Materials


Phase 3: Develop a Community Profile
     In phase three, the board develops a community profile of risk factors, protective factors, and problem
behaviors among community youth; targets two to five of these factors for preventive action;
and identifies existing prevention resources and gaps. (Social scientists use the term protective factors
to refer to influences that protect an individual against risk or problem behavior; for example,
having involved parents is a protective factor against delinquency for many adolescents.)
The major source of data for the community profile is the CTC Youth Survey,4 a questionnaire that
students in grades 6, 8, 10, and 12 fill out in school. This information is supplemented by archival
data (e.g., statistics on school dropout rates and teenage pregnancy or arrest records). The resulting
community profile provides baseline data against which areas targeted for intervention can be evaluated.
Related to this, board members survey service providers to measure the extent to which high quality,
research-based prevention programs that address particular youth problems are already
available in the community and then identify existing gaps in prevention efforts.

Materials
 

  Phase 4: Create a Community Action Plan
     In phase four, board members use information gathered in phase three to develop a Community Action Plan. The board chooses
policies and/or programs from the Model or Promising Programs lists on the Blueprints for Violence Prevention website at  www.colorado.edu/cspv/blueprints/ or from the CTC Prevention Strategies Guide, a compendium of prevention policies and programs found effective in changing risk and protective factors and problem behaviors in at least one high-quality controlled trial. These tested and effective policies and programs include parent training  programs, such as Incredible Years Parent Training, Functional Family Therapy, and Strong African American Families; after-school programs, such as Big Brothers/Big Sisters; and school-based programs, such as Life Skills Training, Promoting Alternative Thinking Strategies (PATHS) and the Good Behavior Game."

Materials


Phase 5: Implement and Evaluate the Community Action Plan
     The last phase consists of implementing the Community Action Plan. Training to implement the
plan emphasizes the importance of adhering faithfully to the content, amount, and manner of delivery
specified in program protocols. Through this training, board members and program staff learn to
track implementation progress, assess changes in participant outcomes, and make adjustments to
achieve program objectives. Monitoring is accomplished through the use of program-specific implementation
checklists, observations, and surveys administered to participants before and after the program
has been introduced. During this phase, the board also reaches out to local media as a way to educate
the community about the rationale for the program and generate public support for the new preventive
interventions.

Materials  

Staff Training Materials:

- Training of trainers
- Training of process facilitator
- Training of coordinators